History of a Big One

Lets share the story of one top notch company in the fly fishing world :simms logo

Simms is a brand founded on the pillars of innovation. It was the brainchild of visionary angler John Simms who saw a need to develop better waders and accessories than what was then available on the market. That quest led to the development of Simms Fishing Products in 1980. During that era, Simms was one of the first companies worldwide to introduce neoprene waders, which provided enhanced warmth and waterproofing armor for serious anglers pushing the limits of their fishing pursuits.

The brand continued to progress under the Jackson-based Life-Link International banner through the ’80s. But it took a giant leap in 1993, when current owner, K.C. Walsh, a passionate angler and entrepreneur, acquired the company and relocated it to Bozeman. Walsh grew up in a flyfishing family and it was his life-long dream to live, and work, and play in Montana.

Under Walsh’s leadership, Simms introduced breathable waders in a trailblazing partnership with W.L. Gore & Associates (makers of GORE-TEX® fabric). That seismic shift breathed new life into wader innovation and has since powered the sport to new levels of comfort and performance. Today Simms continues to mature as a brand with a trained eye on fisheries conservation and inspired product development over a wide swath of technical apparel offerings—from state-of-the art sun protection and wind-blocking outerwear to pioneering CleanStream™ footwear technologies.wade-happiness_800

What remains unswerving, however, is Simms’s commitment to U.S.-based manufacturing and business ideals. When Simms relocated headquarters in 2012, it cemented its Bozeman roots with a new 60,000-square-foot facility housing corporate headquarters, warehouses, and its production plant. This 15,000 square-foot expansion provides elbowroom to drive product evolution in a more efficient and effective manner. It also solidifies Simms as the sole fishing wader manufacturer in the country. Simms currently staffs nearly 120 locally based employees and is a recognized Montana economic ambassador and community contributor.

Although Simms continues to strive for new heights its vision—that stems back to that misty Jackson morning and reverberates through the halls of its new Bozeman stronghold—remains the same: To produce the highest quality products to keep you protected from the elements in any and all fishing conditions.

In addition to this, since the beginning Simms has partnered with leading fisheries conservation organizations the world over, recently spearheading Aquatic Invasive Species education and awareness, while innovating CleanStreamTM technologies to minimize the spread of “hitch-hiking” organisms.

simmsLocally, our folks at Simms are involved in cleanups on the Yellowstone and Madison rivers, Simms sponsors a section of highway along the Madison River, and we support Trout Unlimited (at all levels national, state, regional and local). In addition, the company donates money and time to groups such as the American Rivers, Defend the Upper Colorado, Smith River Watch, Hoh River Watch, Friends of the Delaware, Public Land/Water Access Association, and many more.

Besides, our company and team members support many non-profit organizations that are committed to making the world a better place –through restorative programs that utilize fishing as part of the therapeutic experience or engaging with local youth organizations to promote outdoor activities and conservation through fishing.

Healthy fisheries are essential to this sport’s longevity. You can join them in taking action today.Simms-New-Bldg

Companies like Pointer Flyfishing can enrich and get the maximum of what we do thanks to companies like Simms. These among other aspects are why we choose the best for our guests.

Pablo Aguiló.

Pointer Flyfishing.

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Fly Fishing in Queen Gardens CUBA

We were planning a fishing trip to Cuba for some tarpon, bonefish and if possible, permit. I knew from before that I was going to Paradise, but I didn’t know how paradise looked like… In Paradise we all expect to have some of the best fly fishing we could ever imagined.

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Cuba was a temptation in our bucket list for the famous fishing in the Cayos. It was also a cultural thing for my American and British friends. Cuba is just different to any other part in the world and The Habana has won its reputation for the Rum and the cigars, besides the city itself.

It was a long journey for all of us. From Atlanta, Rob and Weed made a connection through Cancun, and Mike and his sons made a connection from London to Madrid, like Peter, Andrew and Richard did. For me was a connection through Panama City that worked very well. We all arrived one or two days before schedule.

This was not a regular trip and we knew we were going for adventure. We have planned to stay in a floating boat with 10 rooms and private bathrooms, dining room, bar, air conditioned and Wi-Fi connection in the middle of nowhere. The floating boat is anchored in the Cayos of “Jardines de la Reina” that is 3 hours south from Jucaro town and port in Cuba.

So, going to Paradise has a price, and this time was a 5 hour trip by bus (nice one with air condition) and 3 hours by boat to get there. But when you get out from the boat and jump in the skiff boat to go fishing, with your rod in one hand, the fly box in the other one and your backpack with gear and equipment, the world as you know it changes. It feels like a dream for a few to be so far from all our people and family in that crystal clear water.

I took my Crocs as soon as I jumped in the skiff boat, and when we were about to leave for fishing with my guide, I said to my fellows: “good luck chaps, and tight lines”. And then, I had the paradise in front of me.IMG_GR_testimonials1416843374

The skiff boat is flat on the bottom and has a high platform in the back so the guides can row and a platform in the front so we can fish. There is a special area in the front to keep your staff safe and not to interfere with the fishing. I was wearing my Buff protector in my neck, Costa sunglasses, Orvis gloves for saltwater fly fishing and a Columbia SPF. I had a quick-dry long pants beige color. To be protected from the sun is a very important factor if you fly fish in the Caribbean. I put on sunscreen 50, that I also used on my feet.

Little things to consider are, for example to put on sunscreen before your departure every morning so you can clean your hands. Then be sure to keep your gear organized and not to forget anything.  Make sure you have your wading boots or shoes with you, and we recommend you a nice pair of socks to wear every day. Your socks will get wet and then is not going to be comfortable to wear them again. Regarding shirts, the minimum number should be 4 and for fishing pants we recommend 3 light ones.  You will also need some casual clothes to be around in the boat after the fishing. You should consider that weather is in between 80F to 100F. It is very important to have a good Simms rain jacket and some waterproof pants too. There is always a minimum chance to have a rainy and windy day and you will wish you have your gear with you.

The Fishing: It could be from the platform in the boat or wading or the combination of both which is excellent. It is nice to be around on the boat over the flats, which are around 20 to 30 inches of clear water, searching for a movement in the surface or a bonefish tale. It is also lovely to be in the channels in between mangroves, where the water looks greener and transparent, searching for tarpon, or even in the south flats looking for some permit.

IMG_GR_testimonials1416845078The week was amazing and we made an average of 15 to 20 bonefish a day, 2 to 4 tarpons a week, and the group had the luck to get 1 permit total. We have seen and fly fish some barracuda, jack and snapper too.

There were 6 complete days of amazing fly fishing, and in a next report we will write specifically about the fishing, and tell you more secrets about this unique experience of fishing Cuba.

Pablo

Director

Pointer Fly Fishing

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Describe a tarpon: Brutal

The King of Silver has an insatiable appetite, and gets very violent. Tarpon take with power, and show stamina and acrobatic qualities that make tarpon a formidable adversary on a fly rod.

Fishing Tarpon or Sabalo, as it is known in Cuba, can be divided into three categories: Baby Tarpon (those that they weigh up to 30 Lbs), Medium Tarpon (those that weigh 30 Lbs up to 80 Lb) and Monster Tarpon (those of more than 80 Lb and sometimes can surpass the incredible mark of 200 Lbs). Obviously,IMG_GR_testimonials1415304557 the last category is hunted hard, but unfortunately these behemoths are much less common.

When nearing a school of Tarpon, holding an 11 or 12 wt. rod, legs shake and a matchless sensation of adrenalin invades the body, as you anticipate a battle with one of these marine monsters. Sighting and casting accurately play a major role as the angler must reach the school of Tarpon that swim slowly in a circle within meters of the boat. At all times it is important to control one’s nervousness and to never feel intimidated by the presence of these extraordinary beasts.

The beginning of the road to success is to strip strike the fish precisely and firmly. the violent reaction of the Tarpon when it feels the fly in its mouth is going to send him skyward. so you have to bow to the king to keep that line slack and then hold your rod low and keep him under control – easier said than done.IMG_GR_testimonials1415304630

It is a difficult sensation to describe with words

Pablo Aguiló
Pointer Outfitters

Credits to Avalon

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