Early Season Fishing in Alaska

Here at Enchanted Lake Lodge, we love nothing more than showing our guests the incredible fishing, scenery, wildlife and setting that only Alaska can offer.

img_gr_testimonials1479414192

 

Each year many of our potential travelers tend to flock towards the middle of the summer and the months that tend to be more “broadcasted” than the shoulder seasons of early and late summer. While mid-summer (July – August) can be spectacular, there are a few things that every potential Alaskan angler should keep in mind when considering the timing for their next trip.

June and July can provide some of the most consistent, productive rainbow trout fishing found anywhere in the world and why you should consider it when thinking about your next vacation. Take a look at a few key points to keep in mind the next time you’re tempted to brush off the early season in Alaska.

1. HUNGRY, HUNGRY RAINBOWS

Have you ever played the game “Hungry, Hungry Hippos” as a kid, where you try and grab every piece of food that comes your way before anyone else can? If so, picture that but in an Alaskan river fresh off the spring thaw. While the rainbow trout have laid dormant and lethargic for much of the winter season, this is the first big “fiesta” for them to really get after it and bulk up while they can during the short summer season. Because of that, the opportunity to target rainbow trout with a variety of different fly patterns – whether it be dry flies, nymphs, streamers, mice (yes mice) – grows exponentially early season, and it is incredibly hard for rainbows to turn down anything put in front of them.

 

img_gr_testimonials1479414912

 

2.  LOTS OF RIVERS, LITTLE ANGLERS

During the early season in Alaska, many of the lodges and outfitters are not booked solid like they are later in the summer, so the angling pressure is a lot lower with a lot more opportunities for a remote and secluded fishing experience.

 

img_gr_testimonials1479414203

 

3. YOU CAN HAVE A TON OF SUNSHINE

While early season can be a little more susceptible to early precipitation, you can have some incredibly beautiful and sunny days during your early summer week in Alaska. Last year, June saw the highest temperatures of the year and more sun than any other month, making for some beautiful days and great fishing.

4.  DID WE ALREADY MENTION THE AGGRESSIVE RAINBOWS THAT WILL EAT ALMOST ANYTHING? MAYBE WE DID, BUT YOU NEED TO HEAR IT AGAIN.

Early season in Alaska is the real deal, and a time of the summer that is vastly overlooked by too many anglers. We still have a few great openings so call today and learn more about the great fishing opportunities for the coming season.

Contact us today and we’ll be happy to get you started on what can and should be an amazing Alaskan adventure!

Pablo Aguiló

Owner

Pointer Outfitters

Advertisements

Nubian Flats Season 2016 Report I

For the first week of the 2016 Nubian Flats season, we were blessed to be joined by a number of great characters of every corner of the planet. We were joined by Bruce from Scotland, Tom from the USA, and Johan from RSA. An interesting mix of cultures but all three of them had one thing in mind, fish!

img_gr_testimonials1479161632-jpg

Early on the morning of Day 1, the mothership steamed out of the harbour and set course for the first anchorage just south of Snake Island. The plan for the day was to fish the western side of the big Island for the day, looking for triggerfish and trevally. The morning started off well and not long into the walk Tom had a good shot at a permit with-in the 20lbs range. The fish showed good interest and followed the fly but then in true permit fashion, it decided that this was not the day, before spooking off into the distance.

Tom got given a second chance and soon after he was presenting his fly to another smaller permit. Again the fish showed plenty interest, but this time round Tom’s fly got snagged on the bottom. Needles to say, the fish lost interest and went in search of food elsewhere. By midday some clouds(very unusual for this time of the year) rolled in over the area and made sight-fishing a nightmare. With the low visibility, we changed tactics and ended off the day with some teasing along the outside reef of Snake Island. The lads landed some really nice bluefin trevally and ended the day in the high spirits.

img_gr_testimonials1479160800-jpg

On Day 2 the clouds disappeared and the guys got treated to some good fishing. Landing some good titan and yellow margin triggers on the flat, as well as some big bohar on the tease and one big GT lost.

On the morning of Day 3 we moved the mothership to the next anchorage to the north of Snake Island, where we planned to fish the last couple days of the trip before making our way back to Magarsam for the final day.

The massive sand flat that we call Shambaia had a good variety of species which included milkfish, some triggerfish, and trevally (both giant and bluefin), but the glassy conditions were just to calm and we landed very few fish. Most would think that glassy conditions are perfect, but try drop a fly in front of a weary fish without disturbing the water and making a noise. Almost impossible. Outside on the pinnacles however, the fish were on the feed and we tried to capitalize on this.

The flats on these pinnacles had some really big GT’s on them and we got handled by some brute’s! Tom hooked into a monster that somehow unhooked itself, and straight after Johan got cut off by a meter-plus sized fish that was unstoppable and swam him right off the flat and over the edge. On the tease it was even worse. Countless big GT’s were exploding like grenades behind the tease, and tearing through leaders like there was no tomorrow. Like fellow Italian Guide Federico would say, it was a“massacre satanico”. These pinnacles hold some spectacular fish but on this terrain it is almost impossible to land fish. Extremely sharp coral with crazy drop off’s is enough to even shred the best of tackle.

img_gr_testimonials1479162954-jpg

The lads kept the scoreboards ticking over and managed to land some small bluefin but the GT’s were clearly leading the scoreboard. GT’s Hero – Flyfisherman Zero

On the final day we were back on the northern side of the big Island and things were looking up. Bruce opened up the scoreboard by landing a very nice yellow margin triggerfish . Tom followed up soon by hooking into another nice yellow margin but this fish managed to chew through his light tippet before he could get it to the net. Next up Bruce, who was clearly on a good day, landed another beautiful yellow margin triggerfish. If the previous couple day’s hiding by the GT’s weren’t enough, we came across a good 90cm fish in super skinny water, hunting with his back sticking out of the water. Tom quickly got his 12wt ready but it was not to be. He placed the fly right in front of the geet, but got denied. Another victory for the trevally. But thats fishing.

It was a week of many highs and certainly a few lessons in what it takes to land fish in these conditions, but it was a week that was thoroughly enjoyed by all the guests and guides.

Mark Murray

Head Guide