Quillen River, Back After 20 Years

Finally after 20 years I got the chance to come back, to fly fish again at the Quillen River in the province of Neuquen in Argentina. We went there from Cordoba by car, we drove almost a for a full day till we got to the Alumine area where we had organized to stay at the famous Casa de Campo for 5 nights while we would be fishing in different rivers.

In our itinerary our first stop was the Quillen river, for we had decided to go with Christian, a friend and guide from Alumine.


We arrived at Casa de Campo, our accommodation for the trip, and had a great meal with Dani and Marisa where we enjoyed some amazing pasta and nice red wine from Ventus Vineyard. Judging by the wine, we knew this experience was going to be unique. Ventus vineyard is an exclusive premium class wine produced by the first winery in the Province of Neuquen. Neuquen had been considered a desert for a long time, but it has now became an oasis for wine production given its unique characteristics. This highly awarded winery is called “La bodega del fin del mundo” The Winery from the End of the World, given its position in the southernmost part of Argentina.

After that delicious meal, we spend the night together with Juan and the following day we woke up early. At about 6.30, 6.45, we prepared our rods, our lines, all our flies, specially our dry flies and nymphs that would be the ones that we would use the most. We also prepared some sandwiches with tuna, chicken, tomatoes, lettuce, and some special cheese that Juan brought for the occasion. We also took some water and gatorade for the day in a nice cooler. We were expecting a waiting day over big rocks and we were prepared to spend a lot of energy around. We picked up Cristian at around 9 am at Alumine with a selection of flies. We had our boxes packed with flies and a couple of minutes later we were driving in the direction of the river. It is not far away, just 20 minutes driving and we got to a middle area of the river where we got the lines in our rods, mostly number 3,4,5 rods, all with floating lines, long, long leads of 15 feet, normally a tippet in the front of the line to get a good presentation. We were always assuming a fish can break our tippet, especially if it gets tied around the trees in the water or the algae.


Lets talk about the Quillen river for a while. It starts in the mouth of the Quillen lake and runs to the east for about 35 km before joining the Alumine waters. The Quillen river has profuse vegetation on its banks, being willow trees the most typical species.

For February the river had very low level of water and its temperature was kind of warm. We arrived in a very sunny and clear day. During the morning there was no wind, which was nice for fly casting but in a certain way the warm temperature of the water made it more difficult to get the nice fish because they were kind of non active during the morning. In the early morning there was no activity on top of the water but later in the morning the water got calm and we saw a lot of small fish. Unfortunately,  we lost two small fish. Juan lost one fish, he lost this nice fish even before we got the chance to see how big it was. Then something similar happened to me when the line got stuck in a branch of a tree. I was landing on the water and the fish got stuck around with this tippet and I did not have the chance to hold it. Cristian was helping us a lot changing flies. We moved to different spots looking for deep waters that most of the time were calm. We looked for correderas of water, channels of water, trying to get some fish. We saw some action in those channels but the fish were not really trophies. We caught a nice one that was about 15 inches that morning and a couple around 16-17 inches. After that we stopped for lunch, we had a nice lunch looking at the river.


That lunch was amazing, we had some meat prepared by the guys of Casa de Campo and we had some great vegetable salads, too. It is nice to have some light food during the day in the water. We all met the other different groups fishing for lunch. We took a short nap, about 15-20 minutes some of us under the shades, others under the sun. When we recovered our energy we were ready to come back to the water.

Cristian, one of the guides, brought a special wine from Mendoza, where he is originally from. We appreciated that a lot. It was a really nice present from a friend. It was a nice invitation, a red Malbec wine. We decided to keep it for the evening though, save it to have it with some good cheese during a nice sunset at Casa de Campo. After lunch we decided to change the area so we came back to the pick up truck and we started to look for a different area after Christian’s suggestion. We had been in an place with lots of trees around in both sides of the river, which make it impossible to fly cast. We did the casting with the rods, the rods casting way. It was not easy, but we liked the challenge and we managed to cast the flies and present them in the right area where we were expecting to get the fish from.

Cristian was very polite, he helped us change the flies, made suggestions, and fixed leaders. Like our friend from Santiago del Estero province said, “if you’re not getting your flies in the trees, you’re not fishing.” We tried to put the flies in the last little corner looking for a trophy.


During the day Cristian was nice to invite us to fly fish in Mendoza province. There’s a couple of rivers he’d like us to go fish with him. It’s in our bucket list now! A new challenge to go to Mendoza and  see how the fishing works over there and maybe visit some wineries, too.

We had to use loads of sunscreen because the sun was really strong. We were wearing our long sleeves Columbia shirts and nsilta shirts, we were also using buffs to protect ourselves, Simms waders and fly fishing gloves and boots.

We used Sage rods, the zxl, Sage 1, Sage Approach and Sage Method. We found this latest was the better for this waters, it was stronger and we enjoyed it a lot. Sage Approach number 3 was kind of short but very interesting when we caught fish. Sage 6 feet was very challenging for this rivers. By the afternoon when the wind picked up and started blowing stronger we put the rod number 3 in the case and we decided to continue fishing with rods number 4 and 5, specially a Sage 5. It was very helpful.

The day went by very quickly. We could not believe it when we saw it was 6.30 and time to make our way back to the lodge! We were going to meet Rell Tipton, a friend coming from Cordoba where he had been wingshooting; he was joining us for the rest of the fishing trip.


We finally met Rell Tipton that evening at Casa de Campo. He made a great connection: Cordoba, Buenos Aires, San Martin de los Andes. He left in the morning and he landed around 1.30 pm at San  Martin de los Andes in Neuquen Province. Someone from our staff picked him up and took him straight to the river and Rell had some action over there and after some hours he continued driving up north to Casa Campo. 

Casa de Campo is a beautiful lodge located in the town of Alumine in the province of Neuquen. This lodge offers the unique calm typical of rural settings in the foothills of The Andes. Marisa and Dani, the lodge owners, offer the guests the most comfortable experience and wonderful breakfasts in a lodge that offers great accommodations.

The day had been really good to us, a good beginning for our trip! We enjoyed a delicious dinner together with the Malbec wine Cristian had given us. That night we were all excited for the days we had ahead.

Stay tuned and check the following reports about the rest of our experience in Patagonia!


Pablo Aguilo


Pointer Outfitters


Fishing for Dorado in Rio Parana

Imagine this. An unexploited river delta stretching for hundreds of miles with countless of Dorado spots, situated in a truly amazing environment. Then add that you’ll probably be fishing with the best guides available for coming days. Goosebumps!



After a long trip from Sweden with a midnight arrival at the lodge I was nicely greeted with some great food along with the game-plan of our adventure. I was teamed up with Federico, a chef & guide from Cordoba and Ramon, the local guide and host of the lodge. I’ve been on similar trips before, but none were the guides were just as excited to fish as their guests. Young and hungry for adventure, no doubts, this was going to be something special.

Early rise, big breakfast, 5 layers of sunscreen, hit the water and start the chase. This was my first time fly-fishing the legendary river Dorado, and wow – This.Is.A.Beast! 


Know as the Tiger of the river, these guys have a temper and strong territorial behaviour. No need to sneak and be dead quite when you approach, just keep an eye out for activity along the shoreline where they lure for prey. With big flies you can hit the water hard. Try to disturb and trigger their attacks.

You know when you get it right as you’ll probably have an angry Dorado on the other end. Acrobatic jumps, heavy deep pumps and blistering runs…they offer the vast portfolio of tricks to get rid off the fly. Priceless fights plus many screams of excitement from the team… And don’t forget to celebrate your successful catch with some ‘tradicíon’ – a sip of whiskey!


Over three days we mounted up 40h of fishing and we never returned to the same spot. There are countless of opportunities on each corner or current. But make sure you save some energy for the Hora Dorada, the golden hour (20-21:00h).

This is when the big boys come out for dinner. In this time frame – we had +20 strikes, we had Dorados attacking other Dorados, we broken flies from vicious piranhas (that will show no mercy), we had crocodile on the shoreline, birds scouting for prey and 10 something cows swimming by the boat. Action everywhere and non stop fun! Personally, I caught 34 Dorados (…and 34 sips of tradicion) with fish ranging from 1lbs-12lbs.


Jump on the plane, take the overnight bus from Buenos Aires and you’ll find yourself in this unforgettable environment with great people! Many thanks for the service, the food and the fishing.

See you soon Pointer!



Wonderful Fishing in Alphonse

An Alphonse sunrise is one of the most spectacular sightings behold as the sun rises above an endless horizon, split by a white haze of surf, sand and blue ocean. The weather was mostly stable and the tides immense with some of the lowest drops this year.


To the extent that some coral heads that the most seasoned guides had never seen before made an appearance. The inner flats dried up completely at times which meant that the teams mostly headed off to the surf to enjoy the cool pushing tides that made the fishing exceptional.

The starting day of the week referred to as Bonefish Sunday irons out the casting kinks and fine tunes the eye for whats to come during the week.


Father and son Michael and Chris Garbutt managed 48 bonefish between the two of them on Sunday with most the fish of a respectable size. As the days progressed and as always St Francois presented a variety of species for our guests to target.

Jared Zissu was the first of the guests to take advantage of the magnificent surf conditions and landed a Flats Slam consisting of a well-groomed moustache triggerfish, a GT and a hand full of bonefish.


Later on in the week Jared also went on to catch his first sailfish on fly. Following on was Bruce Jackson with a fin perfect 81cm GT and Yuri Telegin with a brace GT’s just falling short of the magic one meter mark at 97cm.

Not only was the surf fishing on fire but the milkfish were out and about with both Josh Hutchins and Michael Talbot managing to hang onto their fish after a lengthy battle and many failed attempts due to hooks pulling and line parting.


Saving the best for last, Bruce and Dmytro Stemkovskyy managed to land good size Indo-Pacific permit each that stretched the tape to well over 60cm fork length. Once again a fun and eventful week of fishing.


Tight lines, happy festive season from the team on Alphonse.


Best Regards

Keith Rose-Innes

Early Season Fishing in Alaska

Here at Enchanted Lake Lodge, we love nothing more than showing our guests the incredible fishing, scenery, wildlife and setting that only Alaska can offer.



Each year many of our potential travelers tend to flock towards the middle of the summer and the months that tend to be more “broadcasted” than the shoulder seasons of early and late summer. While mid-summer (July – August) can be spectacular, there are a few things that every potential Alaskan angler should keep in mind when considering the timing for their next trip.

June and July can provide some of the most consistent, productive rainbow trout fishing found anywhere in the world and why you should consider it when thinking about your next vacation. Take a look at a few key points to keep in mind the next time you’re tempted to brush off the early season in Alaska.


Have you ever played the game “Hungry, Hungry Hippos” as a kid, where you try and grab every piece of food that comes your way before anyone else can? If so, picture that but in an Alaskan river fresh off the spring thaw. While the rainbow trout have laid dormant and lethargic for much of the winter season, this is the first big “fiesta” for them to really get after it and bulk up while they can during the short summer season. Because of that, the opportunity to target rainbow trout with a variety of different fly patterns – whether it be dry flies, nymphs, streamers, mice (yes mice) – grows exponentially early season, and it is incredibly hard for rainbows to turn down anything put in front of them.





During the early season in Alaska, many of the lodges and outfitters are not booked solid like they are later in the summer, so the angling pressure is a lot lower with a lot more opportunities for a remote and secluded fishing experience.





While early season can be a little more susceptible to early precipitation, you can have some incredibly beautiful and sunny days during your early summer week in Alaska. Last year, June saw the highest temperatures of the year and more sun than any other month, making for some beautiful days and great fishing.


Early season in Alaska is the real deal, and a time of the summer that is vastly overlooked by too many anglers. We still have a few great openings so call today and learn more about the great fishing opportunities for the coming season.

Contact us today and we’ll be happy to get you started on what can and should be an amazing Alaskan adventure!

Pablo Aguiló


Pointer Outfitters

Nubian Flats Season 2016 Report I

For the first week of the 2016 Nubian Flats season, we were blessed to be joined by a number of great characters of every corner of the planet. We were joined by Bruce from Scotland, Tom from the USA, and Johan from RSA. An interesting mix of cultures but all three of them had one thing in mind, fish!


Early on the morning of Day 1, the mothership steamed out of the harbour and set course for the first anchorage just south of Snake Island. The plan for the day was to fish the western side of the big Island for the day, looking for triggerfish and trevally. The morning started off well and not long into the walk Tom had a good shot at a permit with-in the 20lbs range. The fish showed good interest and followed the fly but then in true permit fashion, it decided that this was not the day, before spooking off into the distance.

Tom got given a second chance and soon after he was presenting his fly to another smaller permit. Again the fish showed plenty interest, but this time round Tom’s fly got snagged on the bottom. Needles to say, the fish lost interest and went in search of food elsewhere. By midday some clouds(very unusual for this time of the year) rolled in over the area and made sight-fishing a nightmare. With the low visibility, we changed tactics and ended off the day with some teasing along the outside reef of Snake Island. The lads landed some really nice bluefin trevally and ended the day in the high spirits.


On Day 2 the clouds disappeared and the guys got treated to some good fishing. Landing some good titan and yellow margin triggers on the flat, as well as some big bohar on the tease and one big GT lost.

On the morning of Day 3 we moved the mothership to the next anchorage to the north of Snake Island, where we planned to fish the last couple days of the trip before making our way back to Magarsam for the final day.

The massive sand flat that we call Shambaia had a good variety of species which included milkfish, some triggerfish, and trevally (both giant and bluefin), but the glassy conditions were just to calm and we landed very few fish. Most would think that glassy conditions are perfect, but try drop a fly in front of a weary fish without disturbing the water and making a noise. Almost impossible. Outside on the pinnacles however, the fish were on the feed and we tried to capitalize on this.

The flats on these pinnacles had some really big GT’s on them and we got handled by some brute’s! Tom hooked into a monster that somehow unhooked itself, and straight after Johan got cut off by a meter-plus sized fish that was unstoppable and swam him right off the flat and over the edge. On the tease it was even worse. Countless big GT’s were exploding like grenades behind the tease, and tearing through leaders like there was no tomorrow. Like fellow Italian Guide Federico would say, it was a“massacre satanico”. These pinnacles hold some spectacular fish but on this terrain it is almost impossible to land fish. Extremely sharp coral with crazy drop off’s is enough to even shred the best of tackle.


The lads kept the scoreboards ticking over and managed to land some small bluefin but the GT’s were clearly leading the scoreboard. GT’s Hero – Flyfisherman Zero

On the final day we were back on the northern side of the big Island and things were looking up. Bruce opened up the scoreboard by landing a very nice yellow margin triggerfish . Tom followed up soon by hooking into another nice yellow margin but this fish managed to chew through his light tippet before he could get it to the net. Next up Bruce, who was clearly on a good day, landed another beautiful yellow margin triggerfish. If the previous couple day’s hiding by the GT’s weren’t enough, we came across a good 90cm fish in super skinny water, hunting with his back sticking out of the water. Tom quickly got his 12wt ready but it was not to be. He placed the fly right in front of the geet, but got denied. Another victory for the trevally. But thats fishing.

It was a week of many highs and certainly a few lessons in what it takes to land fish in these conditions, but it was a week that was thoroughly enjoyed by all the guests and guides.

Mark Murray

Head Guide

OPTI reel by Loop

Check what is new about the OPTI reel by LOOP, recommended by Pointer Fly Fishing:01_opti_01-2

OPTi reels come in a wide variety of sizes, each optimized for specific fishing applications. Creek and DryFly, with a silky-smooth drag that handles the thinnest leader. The Runner, which is built on the same principles as its big brother Speedrunner, is the obvious choice for light double-hand rods or slightly heavier single-hand rods. Speedrunner features an inset handle andextra diameter for speedsters. The all new Strike shows off some of the best from two worlds: Compact and lightweight as a single-hand reel but with the capacity of a heavy double-hander. A coming favorite for your heavy single-hand and the double-hand artillery! Megaloop comes with dual braking plates anda super sturdy construction for tackling really big fish. The king of the hill is the OPTi Big. With an absolutely huge drag system it is designed to stop anything. The OPTi reel will be your best and most beautiful friend for life.

Technical specifications:

  •   Housing and spool machined from one piece aircraft aluminium.
  •  Waterproof and salt tolerant.01_opti_03-1062x1050
  •   Components in stainless steel and anodised aluminium.
  •   All screws secured with Loc-Tite.
  •   Mechanized components from leading European manufacturers.
  •   Power Matrix Drag System.
  •   Spool designed with a V-Shape for optimal fly line spooling.
  •   Easy-grip progressive brake knob.
  •   Simple, quick spool-change.
  •   Right or left retrieve a snap.
  •   Outgoing click.
  •   Precisely counterbalanced.

Pablo Aguiló

Pointer Fly Fishing

History of a Big One

Lets share the story of one top notch company in the fly fishing world :simms logo

Simms is a brand founded on the pillars of innovation. It was the brainchild of visionary angler John Simms who saw a need to develop better waders and accessories than what was then available on the market. That quest led to the development of Simms Fishing Products in 1980. During that era, Simms was one of the first companies worldwide to introduce neoprene waders, which provided enhanced warmth and waterproofing armor for serious anglers pushing the limits of their fishing pursuits.

The brand continued to progress under the Jackson-based Life-Link International banner through the ’80s. But it took a giant leap in 1993, when current owner, K.C. Walsh, a passionate angler and entrepreneur, acquired the company and relocated it to Bozeman. Walsh grew up in a flyfishing family and it was his life-long dream to live, and work, and play in Montana.

Under Walsh’s leadership, Simms introduced breathable waders in a trailblazing partnership with W.L. Gore & Associates (makers of GORE-TEX® fabric). That seismic shift breathed new life into wader innovation and has since powered the sport to new levels of comfort and performance. Today Simms continues to mature as a brand with a trained eye on fisheries conservation and inspired product development over a wide swath of technical apparel offerings—from state-of-the art sun protection and wind-blocking outerwear to pioneering CleanStream™ footwear technologies.wade-happiness_800

What remains unswerving, however, is Simms’s commitment to U.S.-based manufacturing and business ideals. When Simms relocated headquarters in 2012, it cemented its Bozeman roots with a new 60,000-square-foot facility housing corporate headquarters, warehouses, and its production plant. This 15,000 square-foot expansion provides elbowroom to drive product evolution in a more efficient and effective manner. It also solidifies Simms as the sole fishing wader manufacturer in the country. Simms currently staffs nearly 120 locally based employees and is a recognized Montana economic ambassador and community contributor.

Although Simms continues to strive for new heights its vision—that stems back to that misty Jackson morning and reverberates through the halls of its new Bozeman stronghold—remains the same: To produce the highest quality products to keep you protected from the elements in any and all fishing conditions.

In addition to this, since the beginning Simms has partnered with leading fisheries conservation organizations the world over, recently spearheading Aquatic Invasive Species education and awareness, while innovating CleanStreamTM technologies to minimize the spread of “hitch-hiking” organisms.

simmsLocally, our folks at Simms are involved in cleanups on the Yellowstone and Madison rivers, Simms sponsors a section of highway along the Madison River, and we support Trout Unlimited (at all levels national, state, regional and local). In addition, the company donates money and time to groups such as the American Rivers, Defend the Upper Colorado, Smith River Watch, Hoh River Watch, Friends of the Delaware, Public Land/Water Access Association, and many more.

Besides, our company and team members support many non-profit organizations that are committed to making the world a better place –through restorative programs that utilize fishing as part of the therapeutic experience or engaging with local youth organizations to promote outdoor activities and conservation through fishing.

Healthy fisheries are essential to this sport’s longevity. You can join them in taking action today.Simms-New-Bldg

Companies like Pointer Flyfishing can enrich and get the maximum of what we do thanks to companies like Simms. These among other aspects are why we choose the best for our guests.

Pablo Aguiló.

Pointer Flyfishing.