The Secluded Paradise

The location we were fishing was located halfway to Carlos Paz, through a national park, on a local rancher’s private property. The area itself was gorgeous. Large rock structures jutted from the ground reaching high into the air.

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The terrain was composed of hills covered in sparsely grown shrubs and high grass. The river itself was beautiful, crystal clear with plenty of natural rock formations providing cover for countless Brooke trout. The sun was out and a nice breeze continually swept through the area. Occasionally, a lazy cloud drifted across the sky providing fifteen to twenty minutes of cover. If you saw the fish most likely they saw you as well, making it an intriguing game of predator and prey.

I accompanied Jason, Sam, Juan, Augustin, and Martin today. Our guides, Augustine and Martin, were very excited as we started rigging up the gear. They had fished the day before making sure to scope out the area before our arrival.

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Clearly, they were pleased with the amount of fish and their aggression. Today we were using two four weight fly rods and a three weight rod. Our flies were nymph and moth patterns, exclusively dry flies. We finished setting up and began our walk to the river which was only a couple hundred meters away. As soon as we arrived at the water’s edge, Martin pointed out a small pool behind a large rock with close to fifteenBrooke trout in it. Martin beckoned for me to make the first cast. I complied and was delighted to see a Brooky leap from the water, devouring the fly in one graceful jump. Oh, this was going to be a fantastic day! Setting the hook a bit too hard, the trout flew onto the bank. I picked it up gently and washed it in the stream, slowly releasing it back into the current. It swam quickly back to its starting location where it joined its fellow Brookies.

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I looked to my companions faces and saw excitement strewn about their features. They were anxious and ready to start fishing. The river contained an innumerable amount of spots where hungry fish waited. They would not be disappointed this day. Sam and Jason began fishing. Each were inexperienced with a fly rod, yet their guides were solid fisherman and immediately began giving helpful hints. They were quick learners and adjusted their techniques accordingly. Soon after they mastered the basics of the fly rod, they began catching fish. One, six, ten, fifteen. The fish kept striking and Jason and Sam kept bringing them ashore. The average fish we caught was around half a pound, its length anywhere from six to twelve inches. Before we knew it, lunch time was upon us. We headed back to the vehicles.

Martin and Augustine set up the table for lunch and we all sat comfortably, enjoying the scenery while snacking on a picada. The picada was composed of pickled vegetables, salami, duck pate, cheese, and sliced bread. A delicious appetizer to enjoy while our eyes wandered over the terrain and we shared stories, laughing and grinning in turn. The main course was grilled chicken sandwiches. They were filled with avocado, bell peppers, succulent diced chicken breast, and onions. A light splash of lime juice to add a wonderfully tangy flavor. Martin’s wife is quite the cook! Lastly, for dessert, we had arroz con leche. It was a creamy consistency of rice and milk. A light cinnamon flavor gave it a refreshing taste, cleansing our pallets. As always we have wine, beer, soda, tea, coffee, or water to accompany your meal. All said and done, it was delicious and filling. Finished with lunch, we headed back to the river.

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The rest of the day played out as you might expect. We caught Brooky after Brooky. Their aggression and quantity never faltered throughout the day. The last thirty minutes of our trip, I had wandered ahead a couple hundred meters in front of our group. I casted behind a large rock and watched my fly float nonchalantly for a moment. Then magic occurred. A large brooke struck the fly with a ferocity unmatched by any fish I had caught earlier that day. The fight was exquisite, bringing about a goofy grin to mark my countenance. I slowly tired the fish and brought him to the bank. It was by farone of the biggest fish in the river. It weighed around four pounds and was twenty-two inches in length. I looked around shouting for my companions. They were nowhere to be seen. My heart sank. Every fisherman knows proof is in the pudding. If I didn’t have someone to see me catch this fish, there was no way anyone would believe me when I recounted the story. So, I unhooked the fly and started running up the side of the river. Every ten seconds dipping the fish in the water, allowing water to run through its gills, making sure it could breathe easily. I repeated the procedure for a couple hundred meters until I finally saw my companions. I yelled excitedly beckoning them to come look at the monster I had caught. They quickly hurried over and took pictures. I kept the fish in the water, gently moving water over its gills, then releasing it with a sigh of pleasure. The Brooke moved swiftly into the current and then out of sight. A great way to wrap up the day. Later, before we left, Martin told me that there were maybe fifteen fish in the entirety of that river so large. It’s good to be lucky!

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Finished fishing, we headed back to the vehicles. We were all feeling quite tired and looking forward to a relaxing evening. We were lucky to have such fantastic guideswho provided such a wonderful fishing experience! As always, Pointer Fly Fishingdelivered in full.

Don’t cry for me Argentina!

Parker Tipton

Host & Guide

Pointer Outfitters

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Day two at Collon Cura River

The second day, we fished at Collón Curá river, which is a geographical feature of Neuquén Province, Argentina. It flows southward from the confluence of the Alumine and Chimehuin Rivers, near the town of Junín de los Andes, for around 70 km (44 mi), past which it becomes a tributary of the Limay River. The valley is famous for its two activities: Birdwatching and Fly fishing.

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The temperature of that morning was really nice, I think of about 17ºc, and wind was very slow. We went fishing in three different parts of the river with dry fly and afloat.

We started our day driving west direction and then north direction. When we got to the lake, we embarked with Gonzalo as a head guide, Pablo and David fishing and, the Lieutenant Dan as another guide.
We went fishing to places known as Manhattan, Las Buitreras, and “My Place” (as Pepe calls it); a great place for fly fishing, I must admit.
After sailing a few minutes, we crossed the zone where Andean Condors nest; a huge rock wall well-known in Neuquén.
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The morning of that day, fishing was very active. We caught fifteen Rainbow Trouts and lost ten others. Wind was very calmed but then got stronger at midday, which complicated fishing poles. Pablo y David tried out a Beetle when fishing watching the fish.
We got into the water at 9:30 am. Two fishermen, two guides. Fly lines with 3X and 4X leaders, trying to take out the offspring of some fish that go upwards and are eaten by the trouts.
Those offsprings are from Silverside fish and percs. You can see them at the riversides in low zones and big groups. What the trout does is that, when those little fishes are moving up and down, they eat from them.
At 11 am we could see the trouts jumping and feeding themselves with those offsprings in a special part of the river that is not too deep but always really variable with strong sliding that should be avoided.
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We had lunch on an island in the middle of the river and then we repeated the same kind of fishing in the afternoon.
Going back to San Martin de los Andes took us an hour and a half. David stayed atCasona Del Alto Lodge but before bed, we ate some tasty Pizza Cala and drunk beers.
For this fly fishing we used Parachute Flies and PMX in dry fly. We have also been using original Buff Gloves that are a special polar fleece that blocks 95% of the wind for great protection against cold, great for running, walking, biking and many other outdoor activities like fly fishing, Buff Neckwarmer to protect ourselves from the wind and sun; fleece and a drawstring for quick conversion from neck to headwear, a knitted outer layer combined with a Polartec fleece inner layer, super thermal product.
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Another important thing to protect are our eyes. In order to do that, we used Bolle and Costa sunglases, both with great results.
The first ones are really good for any outdoor activitie. They have this amazing shape and angle of the multi-plane nosepiece that can be adjusted to accommodate any nose bridge for a truly custom fit. The nose pads are very good because those are hypoallergenic and durable and can be tailored for custom fit, giving you additional control and confort. In terms of the optic control system, Bolle helps you stay on top of your game with this interchangeable lens system. By giving you the flexibility to match the lens to the condition, this system ensures optimum performance for any condition.
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The other ones, the Costa sunglasses ar as good as Bolle. In this case, all Costa lenses have 100% UV blockage for maximum protection and 100% polarization to kill reflected glare. Their 580 technology goes beyond polarization to produce the clearest lenses on the planet. It selectively filters out the harsh yellow and harmful high-energy ultraviolet blue light, making colors brighter and objects appear more defined. So no matter what you are doing under the sun, you’ll see it in stunning detail. Glass lenses are best for situations that require ultimate clarity, and the plastic lenses are more cost effective while being more durable for more demanding applications without sacrificing clarity.
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Another brand that we like using when it comes to waders and boots, it’s Simms.
This brand is one of the best in terms of protection because it is a fishing company.  Founded on the pillars of innovation, it strives to build the highest quality products to keep anglers dry, comfortable, and protected from the elements – no matter the conditions.
The Company was the brainchild of visionary angler John Simms who saw a need to develop better waders and accessories than what was then available on the market. That quest led to the development of Simms Fishing Products in 1980. During that era, Simms was one of the first companies worldwide to introduce neoprene waders, which provided enhanced warmth and waterproofing gear for serious anglers pushing the limits of their fishing pursuits.
Today, Simms continues to take the fishing market by storm with a trained eye on fisheries conservation and inspired product development of the worlds premier technical fishing apparel, footwear, and equipment.
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First day at Tromen Lake

This first day, we left Casona Del Alto Lodge in San Martin de los Andes at about 8: 30 am to the lake on west direction from where we spent the night. It was a beautiful sunny morning. Wind was very slow, probably 15 or 20 km/h. After an hour of driving, we got to the lake at about 9:20 am.

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Gonzalo was our main guide, but there was Pepe too as a great guide, and the trouts we have been fishing are Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout and Brook Trout.

The first one is a very special trout, the rainbow trout, also called redband trout, is a species of salmonid native to cold-water tributaries of the Pacific Ocean in North America and Asia.

About appearance, they are torpedo-shaped and generally blue-green or yellow-green in color with a pink streak along their sides, white underbelly, and small black spots on their back and fins.

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Rainbow trout usually inhabit well oxygenated, shallow rivers with gravel bottoms; they also inhabit in lakes, although they are usually found in deeper, cool lakes with adequate shallows and vegetation for good production. The ideal temperature range is 50 to 60 degrees. Lake populations generally require access to gravely bottomed streams to be self-sustaining.

The second one, the brown trout (Salmo trutta), is a European species of salmonid fish that has been widely introduced into suitable environments globally.

The first introductions in Canada occurred in 1886 in Newfoundland and continued through 1933. The only Canadian regions without brown trout are the Yukon and Northwest Territories. Introductions into South America began in 1904 in Argentina.

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The brown trout is a medium-sized fish, growing to 20 kg (44 lb) or more and a length of about 100 cm (39 in) in some localities, although in many smaller rivers, a mature weight of 1.0 kg (2.2 lb) or less is common.

Within the US, brown trout introductions have created self-sustaining fisheries throughout the country. Many are considered \”world-class\” such as in the Great Lakes and in several Arkansas tailwaters. Outside the US and outside its native range in Europe, introduced brown trout have created \”world-class\” fisheries in New Zealand, Patagonia and the Falklands.

Last but not least, we also went fishing brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) is a species of freshwater fish in the salmon family Salmonidae. It is native to Eastern North America in the United States and Canada, but has also been artificially introduced elsewhere in North America and to other continents. In parts of its range, it is also known as the eastern brook trout, speckled trout, brook charr, squaretail, or mud trout, among others. Apotamodromous population in Lake Superior is known as coaster trout or, simply, as coasters. The brook trout is the state fish of nine states: Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia.

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The brook trout inhabits large and small lakes, rivers, streams, creeks, and spring ponds. They prefer clear waters of high purity and a narrow pH range and are sensitive to poor oxygenation, pollution, and changes in pH caused by environmental effects such as acid rain.

We were fly-fishing on Tromen Lake, located inside the Lanin National Park and less than 2 hours north from San Martin de los Andes and Chapelco Airport.

This lake is a really special one. It is 1100 mts above sea level and it is a deep waters lake of about 1200 feet deep.

 

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Embarking boat, we head towards the lake bottom where we fished in stone walls.

The day was great since a little wind made some waves which helped us make a closer fly casting. Everything was catch and release and we used fishing rods Siege number 5 and L.L. bean number 5 too, with leading floating lines 4X and attractors flies afloat and fish hooks between 8 and 14.

On this first day of fishing, we used flys like Fat Albert and Turk’s Tarantula. We were also using Simms gloves, neck protector Columbia, Pointer Flyfishing shirts, Simms Wader and Simms wading boots.

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At the beginning of the morning, we fished around those stone walls. Although shadows didn’t allow us to see the fish clearly, we had really good results as we fished 2 and 3 pounds rainbow trouts mostly. During the morning we hadn’t any brown trout nut we saw a couple of brooks.

At the end of the morning, we had calm waters so we were able to see the fish, doing some casting to the identification of each one.

Between Pablo and David, 4 fish of about 17 to 20 inches and with great presentation on the flies were caught.

After an awesome morning, we had lunch at the camp, eating salads and omelettes, sitting in the sun and enjoying some cold drinks. An hour later we started the afternoon fishing. It started really hard. There was this really hot weather going on and we were costing like an hour without luck until we could finally start fishing again and, at the end, we caught 5.

_EP_0002_1As mentioned, we were fishing in San Martín de los Andes, a city in the province of Neuquén, Argentina. It is located in the Lácar Department in the south-west of the province, at the foot of the Andes.

A major change in settlement life came when in 1937 Lanín National Park was created. This meant that wood logging was gradually reduced and numerous small settlements along the lake shore disappeared. New roads were built effectively connecting San Martín with the rest of Argentina.

At present, either for the ski season or the summer, it is a popular destination for tourism, and the seat of the administration headquarters of the Lanín National Park. Its landscape is one of the most spectacular of Patagonia.

Going back to this incredible fishing day, I remember one moment at 4 pm when we were coasting on the rocks and Gonzalo said that he saw a fish 20 mts away from us and made us throw ourselves behind a log that was almost inside the water. The fly fell 40 cm close to where he said the fish was and we saw the trout turning and catching the fly. The success of that catching was thanks to the best guide of San Martin de los Andes, Gonzalo Flego.

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ANECDOTE

When you throw the fly and it lands on the water, you make something called “twitch” so the fly moves and then you have to leave it still for a few seconds to attract the fish. In this case, Pablo was a little obstinate, so he did the first twitch, saw the fish coming and not catching the fly, and did a second twitch which pissed Pepe off and so he got really angry ! After several minutes of arguing with Pablo telling him what he did was wrong, we all saw a brooke trout catching the fly, noticing that Pablo was right by proving something impossible for Pepe. After all this discussion, we fished some beautiful fontinalis trouts of about 21 inches.

Special weekends at Cordoba

Artisan Flea Market (Barrio Güemes)

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Ten blocks away from Córdoba urban historical shell, we got deep into the renowned Bohemian neighborhood called Güemes to visit the artisan flee market “Paseo de las Artes”. This area is today a meeting place and a hot touristic spot that grows constantly. Every day new restaurants and bars open their doors to the crowd that visits the crafts market on weekends.flea 2

End the day at “El Mercado Central”. A fantastic space that awake all the senses, this restaurant is one of the last big news about the local cuisine. This is an outstanding entrepreneurship mounted in a completely renovated warehouse located in the renowned Barrio Güemes, and endowed with great design and lovely setting space.

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Finally If you want a little bit more of fun …just cross the street and you will enjoy one of the most popular Tango Shows in town at “El Arrabal”. This is a traditional restaurant which becomes bar at night. It is one of the old-styles restaurants in Cordoba. At 6 pm they organize tango lessons and from Thursdays to Saturdays at 11 pm tango shows are held. It also hosts excellent milonga, salsa and folklore shows.

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111 Hotel

If you have not yet decided where to stay, 111 Hotel is strategically located in the traditional corner of Hipólito Yrigoyen avenue and Montevideo street in Nueva Córdoba slider2-escalera-barneighborhood, within the so-called “Media Legua de Oro” (golden half a league). The hotel stands on the epicenter of the cultural, social, gastronomic and tourist activity, and only a couple of meters away from the economic, financial, commercial city center, and the artisan market also.
Yrigoyen 111 Hotel was built from one of Nueva Córdoba’s traditional old mansions from the year 1900. Its facade and interiors were restored by specialists so as to preserve the cultural heritage of the city.
It is a modern urban executive hotel, with a unique modern elegant and restrained style.
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Yrigoyen 111 Hotel has 78 rooms, an Events and Convention Center, and a recreational area, all distributed in its 15 stories. Each story has carpeted hallways creatively decorated with giant pictures of the city of Córdoba and with design details that provide a unique modern and comfortable style.A full breakfast buffet is served on the first floor.
Our 1906 Lounge Bar is the perfect space to relax while enjoying our delicious cocktails and our delightful coffee bar. All guests can enjoy our fitness center and swimming pool located on our rooftop terrace with exceptional views of the city.

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You should be the next one!

Pablo Aguilo

Pointer Outfitters

In the hills of Cordoba

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It was early December when we went flyfishing with Lucas Dominguez to the high mountains of Córdoba. It was necessary to do some survey to see the fishing conditions of a river inside private lands in Altas Cumbres, a beautiful place with incredible landscapes that you cannot miss.

At 7 am we were ready to leave Jesús María and two hours later we were fishing in Altas Cumbres.  On the way there, access was mostly by asphalt and 45km on a dirt road that you can only transit with a 4×4 truck.

IMG_GR_testimonials1456946378Altas Cumbres road is well-know for the historic construction of it. In the last years of the 1950s, it became clear that there was a need to modernize the old Suspension bridges road in the province of Córdoba, Argentina. Increasing traffic and trade between the provinces of Cordoba Mendoza and San Juan needed new roads to expedite travelling times and decrease costs. At the same time, it was considered important to create a route linking the ports of the Atlantic with the Pacific through the Cordoba corridor.

In 1956, President of Provincial Roads Engineer Laisseca said that it was inappropriate for the old road to be improved, but a new one should be built using the best modern technology. For this reason, during the administration of Governor Arturo Zanichelli, an aerial survey of that region of the Sierras Grandes was undertaken to map the topography. Roads were cut to enable surveyors to design the best route.

IMG_GR_testimonials1456946259When we got there, we had to open 6 gates to finally see the river. Then, we left the truck in a place inside the land and walked to the river like 40 minutes.

We decided to put our lunch inside our backpacks and just take the day off to explore the zone. Surprised by rain, we couldn’t fly-fish very well, but we found out that it was a river that goes through the mountains, between the rocks, and has open waters too. It also has few sliding river and huge water mirrors, which makes casting interesting.

When fishing, we used fishing rods number 3 but the conditions were not the best and fish were not catching our fly, so we tried out different types of fly until we found the most suitable one. That day, Lucas did a great job when catching a 7 pound trout, which is very unusual in this part of Córdoba. Four years ago, Lucas laid 10.000 alevin that we can get to see now, but it is really tough to catch them because they are not active yet.

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After lunch, we continued up with some afternoon fishing, going upstream where we left our truck. Afternoon activity was not a very good one, but we saw some nice animals, mostly rainbow trouts and little trouts inside water well.

The walking back was not easy but neither impossible. For everything we used light equipment with little fly, hooks number 16 and 18, dry fly and no streamer except for one case that Lucas put to use with that huge trout he caught.

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At the end of the trip, I can say I have a new challenge; go back there and do another survey when those alevins are more active.

Pablo Aguilo

Pointer Outfitters

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Golden Dorados in Esquina I

IMG_GR_testimonials1454427669We had made an amazing exploration trip for fly fishing Dorado up on the north of Argentina. There is 2 main rivers running from north to south to the Rio de la Plata, one is the Uruguay River, border in between Argentina and Brazil and Uruguay; and the second river is the very well know Parana River and its delta.

Esquina is located in Corrientes province, in the border with Entre Rios Province; it is about 550 miles from Buenos Aires and about 400 miles from Cordoba.

We need to realize how important is the Parana River in South America, it is not one more river in the country, it is an amazing and unique River

IMG_GR_testimonials1454428012The Parana River

Paraná River, Portuguese Rio Paraná, Spanish Río Paraná , Paraná River river of South America, the second longest after the Amazon, rising on the plateau of southeast-central Brazil and flowing generally south to the point where, after a course of 3,032 miles (4,880 km), it joins the Uruguay River to form the extensive Río de la Plata estuary of the Atlantic Ocean.

From its confluence with the Iguaçu River to its junction with the Paraguay River, the Alto Paraná continues as the frontier between Paraguay and Argentina. When it is joined by the Paraguay, it becomes the lower Paraná and commences to flow only through Argentine territory. Near Santa Fé, the lower Paraná receives its last considerable tributary, the Salado River. Between Santa Fé and Rosario the delta of the Paraná begins to form, being 11 miles (18 km) wide at its upper end and roughly 40 miles (65 km) wide at its lower end. Within the delta the river divides again and again into distributary branches, the most important being the last two channels formed, the Paraná Guazú and the Paraná de las Palmas.

The basin of the Alto Paraná has a hot and humid climate year round, with dry winters and rainy summers. The climate of the middle and lower basins ranges from subtropical in the north to temperate humid in the south, with less plentiful rainfall.

The Paraná River has a rich and varied animal life that includes many species of edible fish.

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The Paraná River is the mandatory destination for lovers of fly-fishing in search for catching some dorado specimen. Salminus brasiliensis (dorado, golden dorado or jaw characin) is a large river fish found in central and east-central South America. Despite having Salminus in its name, the dorado is not related to any species of salmon, nor to the saltwater fish also called dorado. It is very popular among recreational anglers and supports large commercial fisheries.

Dorado is exceptionally strong and range in size from 6 to 45 pounds. The record has being 70 pounds.

The Dorado is the most beautiful fish that dwells in the waters of the Paraná River. Baptized as the tiger of the rivers, its mood and hunting voracity at the time of getting food are the perfect base for its well-deserved nickname.

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The exploration tour – 2 anglers and a camera man

We woke up early in Cordoba Argentina and drove from 5am till 11am till we got to Esquina, Corrientes, we had cross, Santa Fe province and Entre Rios province to get there, it is not an easy ride but we are used to long distance driving.

We were getting ansious every mile we were closer to the lodge, and we were talking and drinking coffee like crazy just killing the time in between the present and the time when we will be ready in the boat.

We had cross the great agriculture area from Cordoba and Santa fe till the farmer area for cattle in northern Entre Rios and Corrientes. The driving was safe and nobody slept in the car, we know we had to be there for lunch (they were waiting for us with an asado / barbeque)and ready to jump on a boat to go fishing.

There is no many good guides for fly fishing dorado, so excellent guides is a rare situation, we had contact some of the best in the area, we have been in touch with Matute, Guillermo and Nacho. Nacho ended up being our guide the 2 days we have been in the water.

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Bad News

It was late October when we got there, for me was the first time in the area, but my friend Lucas had been several times, and he is a prolific and professional fly caster, he had a lot of experience and he had been around the world with his fly rods.

The Best months for dorado fishing on the Parana is January through May and September and October. By the time fall arrives in late May and early June, the water cools down and the fish are less active.

Weather was hot but not terrible hot if you think that could be 110F in the worst time of the year with humidity.

We had met Nacho and made some jokes for camaraderie, and 20 minutes later Nacho had told us: “fishing is dead to Cero”

“what?, cant be dead to cero” we said, there is always a chance. We were surprise and suddenly I had felt stupid for driving 400 miles and get there for this bad news.

He said the last 3 days were amazing and the weather had change 24 hours ago and the last hours in the water were really bad. He had shown us some pictures from the weekend fishing, and told us: “it is a pity you couldn’t come 2 days ago”. We couldn’t believe it. Suddenly the weather was hotter than some minutes ago.

But we are going fishing he said, and we should fly fish the Corrientes river. The Corrientes river gets into the Parana just there in Esquina.  The Corriente River is a river in the Argentine province of Corrientes, in the Mesopotamia. It flows from the Itatí Lagoon, in the center-north of the province, and drains the large basin of the Iberá Wetlands, about 13,000 square kilometres (5,000 sq mi). It flows southwest, across marshes (bañados), and empties into the flood plain of the Paraná River near the city of Esquina.

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Warm up afternoon and not to bad

We had set our rods, all #8wt. with floating lines. We had used some sages Z-Axis, some TFO and Loops rods, with Rio lines for salt and sweet water. Our leaders and tippets were also Rio.

We had dress with quick dry and light pants and some Columbia quick dry shirts. It is important to have light neck cover and gloves as well and sun glasses and caps or hats, the sun is really strong in this area. We highly recommend sunblock over 50 protections, and drinking a lot of water for hidratation.

We had made a ride by boat for about 30 minutes into the Corrientes river, we could see some banks and a lot of forest close by to the coast. We could feel it, the action was there. We had tried different areas, always casting close by to the banks, were the water was running, close by to the trees in the water and different formations with bushes into the water.

After 30 minutes of casting we were doing very well and most of the cast had been accuracy. We could feel fish coming, even in bad weather conditions and in a bad luck day.

The day was not that good, it took us like 3 or 4 hours to get our first fish, and nacho was searching different areas, trying to find the right place for us, as a guide he works really hard to get fish on the boat, what is the most important condition to be a good guide.

I lost the first one, and I was blaming myself in silence, nobody say anything about it. And we went to the next area. Shit! Yes, shit happens!

IMG_GR_testimonials1454428344But some minutes later I had been able to get our first fish, that was very aggressive with the fly and also with the fight, the water current had helped him to be a strong soldier! It was a 7 pound nice Dorado, and we had taken some nice pictures and release him again in the water.

We had a couple of fish that afternoon, but we were worry about the following day, the fishing was fun but poor compare with then Famous Parana River, and as Nacho said, it was not our fault, the flies were in the right place.

You should read the second part of this report, because the following morning start raining at 6am and the unexpected had happened!!! 

Ps, read our next report Golden Dorados in Esquina II and checked what had happened

Pablo Aguilo

Pointer Fly Fishing Exploration

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Tanzania Tigerfish Week 9

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The last week of the Tanzania tiger season came in what seemed like a blink of an eye. This week we welcomed back Dr Bentele for the fourth straight season. He was joined by two new anglers, Randy from the USA and Johan from Germany.

The guys started things off on the Mnyera and connected with big fish on both days on this river. Despite getting plenty of shots though, the guys really battled to convert and by the end of day two, they managed a good number of fish with the highlights being an 11 and 15lbs fish.

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Day 3 the guys made the trek over to the Ruhudji river and were greeted by seriously hungry fish! The first Ruhudji session was fished on the lower beat and fish of all kinds and sizes were throwing themselves at the flies! By the end of the day, each angler had some serious line burn on their fingers to remember this special session. As with most big tigerfish, they managed to get the better of the anglers but some really good fish were still landed. Both Karl and Randy lost fish in access of 20lbs after some spectacular jumps. Randy however still managed to bag a solid 15lb fish, while John was laying down the law and hammered many 8 to 11lbs fish! Things were looking good for the next two days.

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Day 4 & 5 was fished on the upper and middle beat. The guys experienced some exceptional fishing on the upper Ruhudji, especially the section close to the remote Matumbi village, tucked away in the mountains at the top of the concession. Along this area the water is so clean that you can see the fish before it eats the fly! Again the guys did battle with numbers of fish in the 20lbs range but a lot of bad luck made converting these eats nearly impossible. Fish biting through wire, jumping off before the net, and just spitting the fly on the second or third jump. John however was keeping the guys in the game by landing a solid 15lbs tiger and a number of fish in the 10lbs range. Despite the amount of fish lost, everyone was having a good time and spirits were high for the last day in the rapids.

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The rapids are not an easy place to fish, especially on fly. Most of the spots, one does have room for a proper  back cast and with fast flowing water it meant controlling the fly was not an easy job.

The fish were not overly aggressive as hoped, but the ones that did eat were quite sneaky. Hitting the fly as it hit the water, leaving the angler with no time to gain control of the line  and set the hook! Some of the bigger fish also used the fast currents and structure to their advantage and leaving everyone with broken off leaders and lines.

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The last two hours of the day was spent fishing off the boat on the upper reaches of the Mnyera. As was the story of the week, some monsters were hooked, but for various reasons, did not stick. Many fish in the 8 – 12 lb range were landed, and so marked the end of the trip, and a great 2014 season.

IMG_GR_testimonials1448467805Thanks to all our guest who joined us this year, although it was a tougher season than usual due to the crazy weather, however great fish were caught and unforgettable memories made. The high cold water over the season has resulted in all fish being caught in being prime condition, fat and healthy. It was a constant over the season, and guides commented through out the season at what super condition the fish were in due to the colder than average temps.  This bodes well for a great spawning season, and a super 2015. We can’t wait to get back and look forward to welcoming past and new guests back to this amazing corner of Tanzania, home to the infamous trophy tigerfish of the Mnyera and Ruhudji Rivers.

Kindest Regards

Rob Scott

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My Agua Boa experience

Pablo – hey buddy!! Let me answer some of your question. All aspects of the trip were very good!! Two guys per boat with one guide poling – always plenty of ice – each person made their sandwiches in the morning for lunch / breakfast and dinner was very adequate.

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Two per room with ac – wifi at main lodge but not in room – do take your own liquor of choice – had plenty of wine like at lodges in Argentina/ accommodations certainly not as plush as lodges in Argentina but remember where you are.

We carried 8 and nine wt fly rods with good selection of streamers but don\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’t 8-any names – huge swimming pool waist deep with wade up bar and hourdervs (sp)- you know bob and I like nice stuff and I have been lobbying to go back, logistics from US as all fly fishing destinations around the world are not easy.
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One more thing: sort of long getting there from USA – Miami then spend the night there- next morning fly to Manaus and required to spend the night there then fly to airstrip at agua boa. Probably next time could be Manaus for 2 nights.
Check this info about the river: The Agua Boa River is a small clear water river flowing over white sand. The river begins high in the Mocidade mountains to its confluence with the Branco river. It is flanked by upland forest, flood forest and savannah with all of its wildlife still intact. This combination of pristine and varied habitats makes for both
interesting and scenic fishing.low_60012
The Agua Boa fishery revolves around lagoons, inland lakes, and the river channel. The Agua Boa is home to all three species of Peacock Bass – the Butterfly Peacock, the Spotted Peacock and the Temensis Peacock.
Me and my friends visit the Agua Boa Amazon Lodge strictly to sight fish for peacock bass, arowana, pacu and a host of other jungle species.
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There was another group with very skilled fly fishermen and they caught a good many fish – bob and I had one really superb day – we caught approximately – 15 total but four or so – 18lbers and several more 8-12 lbs. Yes! lunch is under shade on side of river, hammocks if you want. At lunch you might be hour or so boat ride from lodge – you know how fishing is – water level , clarity, weather but you should have a great time.
My best,
David West

Patagonia’s Endless Summer with Andes Drifters

Fly fishing with our associated partners in North Patagonia, Andes Drifters, and his CEO and General manager Gustavo Hiebaum.­ News from last season…

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It turns out there is a cure for winter. The sky is blue. The sun is warm. Red stone cliffs rise above deep green water. Rolling hills covered in sage brush, or what looks like sage brush, roll uninterrupted as far as the eye can see. Twenty­inch brown trout rise out every green pocket to eat big bushy dry flies. It’s January and at home pipes are bursting in my basement.

I could swear I was in Montana. It looks so much like Montana. I didn’t expect that. Just like Montana summer, until you spot a group of llamas resting by the river or a snow covered volcano or a condor sailing like a pterodactyl overhead or your guide says something like, “give it to me please, the fly.”

IMG_GR_testimonials1438102816So much about Patagonia is familiar and so much strange. The language, the customs and the wildlife may seem strange, but rivers are rivers and trout, trout. My fly knows what to do here and it does it time and time again.

We float beautiful wild rivers and never see another boat. We fish long days. The sun is up late here, less than five­hundred miles from Antarctica. The water is so clear you can count the pebbles at the bottom of the deepest runs. The air is warm and sweet and even the fish seem to be carried away in the innocence of summer. I drink wine and eat dolce de leche as the crawlspace at home fills with water.

IMG_GR_testimonials1438008751At night we gather around a fire and watch a goat brown on a spit. We drink too much and sleep under the southern cross. I hear Crosby Stills and Nash singing “Southern Cross” in my head all week. The guides tell stories in Spanish long after I have drifted off. They are full of life and love of this land and these waters. It’s easy to imagine that it’s always summer here. That the pipes never freeze.

Patagonia with its red stag and giant birds, its wine and its chocolate, its classical guitars and tango dancers. This beautiful wild Montana of the south with its volcanos and its wind and its crazy, drunken Spanish stories and its wild, wild rivers and its hungry trout. The whole place feels like a fairy tale. Like something lost in time. Like a drunken story told in Spanish by a roaring fire.

IMG_GR_testimonials1438102854The whole week I feel like a high school kid who’s snuck into a college party. Like I’ll wake up somewhere else, somewhere cold and wet with awful work to do. I try to drink it in. I try to tell myself it’s real and it can last. I land one last big brown trout and we row off the river. I ride through the desert in a pickup truck. I take pills and I sleep on the plane. I wake up somewhere cold and wet, with awful work to do.

But I can’t stop thinking about Patagonia. I keep thinking about that politician from South Carolina who told everyone he was going to hike the Appalachian trail, disappeared to Argentina and fell in love with some beautiful dark­haired woman, burned his whole career and family to the ground. I think about that poor miserable bastard while I lay in the dirt of my crawl space in the cold and the wet and I want to be him so bad I could cry.

IMG_GR_testimonials1438102958In the end, the trip to Patagonia cost about the same as the plumbing. I think I’ll do it again next year. Not the plumbing.

Thanks Louis!

Gustavo Hiebaum -­ Andes Drifters

By Louis Cahill/ Gink & Gasoline

http://www.ginkandgasoline.com

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Cuba

If you’re planning a Fly Fishing trip to Cuba, an island full of majestic yet voracious Tarpon, you may want to learn a little more about the history of this Caribbean paradise!

La Habana

Cuba was first discovered by Christopher Columbus on October 27th, 1492. For a man who had seen countless tropical islands, he was extremely impressed with Cuba and said ¨it is the most beautiful land human eyes have ever seen¨. After its discovery, the island was quickly colonized by the Spaniards, at the expense of the local aboriginal population, and by the sixteen hundreds, the first seven settlements: Baracoa, Bayamo, Trinidad, Sancti Spiritus, Puerto Principe and San Cristobal de la Habana had been founded.
By the nineteenth century, the Cuban population had become so distanced from their cousins in Spain that a movement began for independence from Europe.
The first war of independence began on October 1868 and was led by Carlos Manuel de Cespedes, ¨the father of the country¨. After ten years of fighting, the struggle ended in defeat.

The second attempt started on February 24th, 1895, and was led this time by Jose Marti who is considered the national hero of the country. He founded the Cuban Revolutionary Party and by 1898 victory was within sight. However, the US Government intervened, declared war on Spain, and after Spain was defeated kept the Cubans from attaining power.

The Republic was declared on May 20th, 1902, and was followed by a long period of economic and political dominance by the US that lasted until January 1st, 1959, when the Revolution finally triumphed. This was after several years of fighting in Sierra Maestra Mountains near Santiago and an underground struggle in the cities that finally toppled the Batista government on New Year’s Eve.

Fly Fishing in paradise!

Fly Fishing in paradise!

Now that you know a bit more… Don’t you wanna go? For more information about our tailor made Fly Fishing trips, please visit our website www.pointerflyfishing.com