Quillen River, Back After 20 Years

Finally after 20 years I got the chance to come back, to fly fish again at the Quillen River in the province of Neuquen in Argentina. We went there from Cordoba by car, we drove almost a for a full day till we got to the Alumine area where we had organized to stay at the famous Casa de Campo for 5 nights while we would be fishing in different rivers.

In our itinerary our first stop was the Quillen river, for we had decided to go with Christian, a friend and guide from Alumine.


We arrived at Casa de Campo, our accommodation for the trip, and had a great meal with Dani and Marisa where we enjoyed some amazing pasta and nice red wine from Ventus Vineyard. Judging by the wine, we knew this experience was going to be unique. Ventus vineyard is an exclusive premium class wine produced by the first winery in the Province of Neuquen. Neuquen had been considered a desert for a long time, but it has now became an oasis for wine production given its unique characteristics. This highly awarded winery is called “La bodega del fin del mundo” The Winery from the End of the World, given its position in the southernmost part of Argentina.

After that delicious meal, we spend the night together with Juan and the following day we woke up early. At about 6.30, 6.45, we prepared our rods, our lines, all our flies, specially our dry flies and nymphs that would be the ones that we would use the most. We also prepared some sandwiches with tuna, chicken, tomatoes, lettuce, and some special cheese that Juan brought for the occasion. We also took some water and gatorade for the day in a nice cooler. We were expecting a waiting day over big rocks and we were prepared to spend a lot of energy around. We picked up Cristian at around 9 am at Alumine with a selection of flies. We had our boxes packed with flies and a couple of minutes later we were driving in the direction of the river. It is not far away, just 20 minutes driving and we got to a middle area of the river where we got the lines in our rods, mostly number 3,4,5 rods, all with floating lines, long, long leads of 15 feet, normally a tippet in the front of the line to get a good presentation. We were always assuming a fish can break our tippet, especially if it gets tied around the trees in the water or the algae.


Lets talk about the Quillen river for a while. It starts in the mouth of the Quillen lake and runs to the east for about 35 km before joining the Alumine waters. The Quillen river has profuse vegetation on its banks, being willow trees the most typical species.

For February the river had very low level of water and its temperature was kind of warm. We arrived in a very sunny and clear day. During the morning there was no wind, which was nice for fly casting but in a certain way the warm temperature of the water made it more difficult to get the nice fish because they were kind of non active during the morning. In the early morning there was no activity on top of the water but later in the morning the water got calm and we saw a lot of small fish. Unfortunately,  we lost two small fish. Juan lost one fish, he lost this nice fish even before we got the chance to see how big it was. Then something similar happened to me when the line got stuck in a branch of a tree. I was landing on the water and the fish got stuck around with this tippet and I did not have the chance to hold it. Cristian was helping us a lot changing flies. We moved to different spots looking for deep waters that most of the time were calm. We looked for correderas of water, channels of water, trying to get some fish. We saw some action in those channels but the fish were not really trophies. We caught a nice one that was about 15 inches that morning and a couple around 16-17 inches. After that we stopped for lunch, we had a nice lunch looking at the river.


That lunch was amazing, we had some meat prepared by the guys of Casa de Campo and we had some great vegetable salads, too. It is nice to have some light food during the day in the water. We all met the other different groups fishing for lunch. We took a short nap, about 15-20 minutes some of us under the shades, others under the sun. When we recovered our energy we were ready to come back to the water.

Cristian, one of the guides, brought a special wine from Mendoza, where he is originally from. We appreciated that a lot. It was a really nice present from a friend. It was a nice invitation, a red Malbec wine. We decided to keep it for the evening though, save it to have it with some good cheese during a nice sunset at Casa de Campo. After lunch we decided to change the area so we came back to the pick up truck and we started to look for a different area after Christian’s suggestion. We had been in an place with lots of trees around in both sides of the river, which make it impossible to fly cast. We did the casting with the rods, the rods casting way. It was not easy, but we liked the challenge and we managed to cast the flies and present them in the right area where we were expecting to get the fish from.

Cristian was very polite, he helped us change the flies, made suggestions, and fixed leaders. Like our friend from Santiago del Estero province said, “if you’re not getting your flies in the trees, you’re not fishing.” We tried to put the flies in the last little corner looking for a trophy.


During the day Cristian was nice to invite us to fly fish in Mendoza province. There’s a couple of rivers he’d like us to go fish with him. It’s in our bucket list now! A new challenge to go to Mendoza and  see how the fishing works over there and maybe visit some wineries, too.

We had to use loads of sunscreen because the sun was really strong. We were wearing our long sleeves Columbia shirts and nsilta shirts, we were also using buffs to protect ourselves, Simms waders and fly fishing gloves and boots.

We used Sage rods, the zxl, Sage 1, Sage Approach and Sage Method. We found this latest was the better for this waters, it was stronger and we enjoyed it a lot. Sage Approach number 3 was kind of short but very interesting when we caught fish. Sage 6 feet was very challenging for this rivers. By the afternoon when the wind picked up and started blowing stronger we put the rod number 3 in the case and we decided to continue fishing with rods number 4 and 5, specially a Sage 5. It was very helpful.

The day went by very quickly. We could not believe it when we saw it was 6.30 and time to make our way back to the lodge! We were going to meet Rell Tipton, a friend coming from Cordoba where he had been wingshooting; he was joining us for the rest of the fishing trip.


We finally met Rell Tipton that evening at Casa de Campo. He made a great connection: Cordoba, Buenos Aires, San Martin de los Andes. He left in the morning and he landed around 1.30 pm at San  Martin de los Andes in Neuquen Province. Someone from our staff picked him up and took him straight to the river and Rell had some action over there and after some hours he continued driving up north to Casa Campo. 

Casa de Campo is a beautiful lodge located in the town of Alumine in the province of Neuquen. This lodge offers the unique calm typical of rural settings in the foothills of The Andes. Marisa and Dani, the lodge owners, offer the guests the most comfortable experience and wonderful breakfasts in a lodge that offers great accommodations.

The day had been really good to us, a good beginning for our trip! We enjoyed a delicious dinner together with the Malbec wine Cristian had given us. That night we were all excited for the days we had ahead.

Stay tuned and check the following reports about the rest of our experience in Patagonia!


Pablo Aguilo


Pointer Outfitters


Wonderful Fishing in Alphonse

An Alphonse sunrise is one of the most spectacular sightings behold as the sun rises above an endless horizon, split by a white haze of surf, sand and blue ocean. The weather was mostly stable and the tides immense with some of the lowest drops this year.


To the extent that some coral heads that the most seasoned guides had never seen before made an appearance. The inner flats dried up completely at times which meant that the teams mostly headed off to the surf to enjoy the cool pushing tides that made the fishing exceptional.

The starting day of the week referred to as Bonefish Sunday irons out the casting kinks and fine tunes the eye for whats to come during the week.


Father and son Michael and Chris Garbutt managed 48 bonefish between the two of them on Sunday with most the fish of a respectable size. As the days progressed and as always St Francois presented a variety of species for our guests to target.

Jared Zissu was the first of the guests to take advantage of the magnificent surf conditions and landed a Flats Slam consisting of a well-groomed moustache triggerfish, a GT and a hand full of bonefish.


Later on in the week Jared also went on to catch his first sailfish on fly. Following on was Bruce Jackson with a fin perfect 81cm GT and Yuri Telegin with a brace GT’s just falling short of the magic one meter mark at 97cm.

Not only was the surf fishing on fire but the milkfish were out and about with both Josh Hutchins and Michael Talbot managing to hang onto their fish after a lengthy battle and many failed attempts due to hooks pulling and line parting.


Saving the best for last, Bruce and Dmytro Stemkovskyy managed to land good size Indo-Pacific permit each that stretched the tape to well over 60cm fork length. Once again a fun and eventful week of fishing.


Tight lines, happy festive season from the team on Alphonse.


Best Regards

Keith Rose-Innes

A Legendary Adventure

Fly anglers are a different sort as many of you know. An immediate bond is created between perfect strangers when the discussion of fly fishing comes up in conversation, which frequently does.


I realize I’m biased on this topic but, seriously, can you imagine having an animated impassioned conversation with a perfect stranger if you were, say, a thimble collector? No offense to thimble collectors but the passion and the experiences just aren’t the same.

Evidence is found in the fly angler’s willingness to travel far and wide, crossing oceans and continents, just to have an opportunity to fly fish new water with new friends who may not even speak your language. Such is the case with Argentina, and with Andes Drifters out of San Martin de los Andes in particular.


The trout of Argentina are legendary of course. But it’s more than this. It’s the entire adventure; the land, the history, the people. When you leave Buenos Aires and then Bariloche on your way to San Martin, you actually feel your mind and body changing pace. You’re with new friends now in a different world than the one you left back home. And it’s comfortable yet full of anticipation.

You’re fly fishing for world class brown and rainbow trout in a variety of settings. Each day is different yet tailored to your desires. Day one may be wade fishing the mouth of a river where it enters a lake. Tiny minnows are migrating from the lake to the river to spawn and huge trout are following them. It’s a feeding blitz like you’ve never seen in freshwater.


Day two can find you on a crystal clear glacial lake carved out of the Andes eons ago. You’re fishing big attractor dry flies as the winds pick up and create enough disturbance on the surface to bring up cruising browns and rainbows looking for a meal.

The morning of your third day finds you standing at river’s edge watching a magnificently choreographed beehive of activity as the guides and support staff load rafts for an overnighter on the Collon Cura River. The camp staff will move on downstream of the anglers and have everything set up by the time you step out on land at day’s end. A gourmet meal and the famous Malbec wine await you. As you drift off to sleep, you wonder if tomorrow can possibly be as good as today. The answer; Yes, yes it can.

In all my travels, Gustavo Hiebaum and his staff at Andes Drifters are second to none. They are the friendliest, most accommodating group you’ll find and they show it in their eagerness to insure your complete satisfaction. If you want a break from fishing, they have a myriad of other activities available from hiking and biking to art galleries and sailing from which you may choose.


Jimmy Harris

Courtesy of Andes Drifters

The Land of Giants

The first week of the highly anticipated Cosmoledo 2016 – 17 season kicked off with a bang. The first group of guests aboard our luxurious 85ft mother ship, Lone Star, included father and son team Jeff and Ryan Monsein, Kay Jones, Matt Naber, Egor Chulanov, Stanislav Gorbounov and Nickolai Stelmach.


With the tidal cycle moving into spring tides and a ‘super moon’ later in the week, everything looked perfect for big water movements and big fish!

As comfortable as the Lone Star is it didn’t take too much convincing to get the team onto the skiffs and racing to the hot spots.

Ryan opened his GT account with a monster of 120 cm, a giant fish by any standards. Not to be out done, Matt made the perfect cast with a NYAP that could not be refused by another giant. The ensuing tussle with a 125 cm of angry giant trevally made Matt’s day.

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Two fish over 120 cm on the opening day of the season had all the guests and guides fired up for the rest of the week. As the week progressed more and more GTs were caught with stories shared over cold beers about big fish hooked and lost and so many close encounters with the fish of a lifetime. Kay Jones managed an impressive count of GT for the week including a solid 102cm fish as well as a pair of Moustache triggerfish.

Matt continued where he started by landing a total of 17 GTs, his first ever moustache triggerfish, a dogtooth tuna along with many more species. Jeff had an impressive tally of GT, his first ever moustache triggerfish and a bus 10 lbs bonefish that made sure he ended his week in stellar form.

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A total of 84 GTs, 5 Triggerfish, numerous trophy bonefish and a host of big bluefin trevally, bohar snapper, barracuda and dogtooth tuna made for a great weeks fishing on one of the planets premier saltwater destinations.

The guide team and crew of the Lone Star could not have asked for a better start to the season and all look forward to what the rest of the season has in store for our guests.

Tight lines from the team.

Best Regards

Keith Rose-Innes

Alphonse Island The Dream

I have seen a great video some months ago, and for the first time in my life I had found out what a Giant Trevally or a GT looks like! Amazing!


No many times in my life I had the feeling that there was something I had to do in the next 24 months to be extremely happy, and I promise myself I will go there no matter what. So, I had thought to call them and get reservations for 2017 for a group of 6 people, and since then I had started thinking, who will be those six crazy fly fishermen that will come with me to this lost place in Paradise.

alphonse 2

The fishing looks crazy. There are 7 species there but really one epic fish, the giant trevally. I have seen one of the most amazing videos about GT made by 7 degrees south 30 sec teaser. I would like to share this link in this report because is such an amazing video, that I would like every one of my friends to enjoy it:

7 degrees south 30 sec teaser

I hope you had as much fun and joy watching that video as I still do every time I have the pleasure to watch it. Adrenaline!!!

alphonse 6

So, it was funny; where the heck is Alphonse Island? No idea.

Only google maps can help, right?

But the surprise was when I had seen the island is as big as the land trip, and I was working with the zoom in my screen, and only water, and salt water and more water… only water, and finally I had seen another small island, Desroches Island. At that time, in your screen you will see nothing, just water!!! NOTHING! Just water!!! I want to be there!! And I had continue playing with the zoom and finally I had seen Seychelles!!! We are in the Indic Ocean. Desroches is only a little bigger than Alphonse! Just a little biger LOL

I am on my way to Alphonse! It is a dream! And I would like to do it with 5 more friends!

So I had started reading about it and this is what I have found out in their website:

Considered a fly anglers paradise, the expansive sea flats surrounding the atolls of Alphonse and St Francois provide the fly fishing experience of a lifetime. This spectacular wilderness has ten thousand acres of white sand flats, which provide easy wading and world class site fishing. The atolls are home to incredibly large populations of Bonefish, 3 different types of Triggerfish, Barracuda, Snapper, Grouper, Permit, Parrotfish, 8 species of Trevally (including the Giant Trevally), and the incomparable Milkfish.

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This diversity gives anglers the opportunity to target a myriad of different species during their stay. The St Francois fishery caters for just 12 fly anglers at a time to maintain exclusivity and sustainability. To ensure guests the ultimate fishing experience, an international team of knowledgeable guides and qualified managers are on hand to share their passion for this unique fishery and its environment. Anglers are transferred for the short run from Alphonse to St François lagoon by the 40′ mother ship to where the skiffs are kept anchored.

The fishing is very much tide dependent so the prevailing conditions will dictate which species you will focus on. You are then able to access the vast expanse of flats, lagoons, channels and reefs which spoil anglers in the choice of environment and species for which they would like to hunt. The accommodation at Alphonse is amongst some of the most comfortable you will encounter at any fly fishing destination in the world.

I am excited, and I hope you get excited too. We are going!

So, what to do now? Just send an email and get in touch.

So I have called …

Pablo Aguilo


Pointer Outfitters

Early Season Fishing in Alaska

Here at Enchanted Lake Lodge, we love nothing more than showing our guests the incredible fishing, scenery, wildlife and setting that only Alaska can offer.



Each year many of our potential travelers tend to flock towards the middle of the summer and the months that tend to be more “broadcasted” than the shoulder seasons of early and late summer. While mid-summer (July – August) can be spectacular, there are a few things that every potential Alaskan angler should keep in mind when considering the timing for their next trip.

June and July can provide some of the most consistent, productive rainbow trout fishing found anywhere in the world and why you should consider it when thinking about your next vacation. Take a look at a few key points to keep in mind the next time you’re tempted to brush off the early season in Alaska.


Have you ever played the game “Hungry, Hungry Hippos” as a kid, where you try and grab every piece of food that comes your way before anyone else can? If so, picture that but in an Alaskan river fresh off the spring thaw. While the rainbow trout have laid dormant and lethargic for much of the winter season, this is the first big “fiesta” for them to really get after it and bulk up while they can during the short summer season. Because of that, the opportunity to target rainbow trout with a variety of different fly patterns – whether it be dry flies, nymphs, streamers, mice (yes mice) – grows exponentially early season, and it is incredibly hard for rainbows to turn down anything put in front of them.





During the early season in Alaska, many of the lodges and outfitters are not booked solid like they are later in the summer, so the angling pressure is a lot lower with a lot more opportunities for a remote and secluded fishing experience.





While early season can be a little more susceptible to early precipitation, you can have some incredibly beautiful and sunny days during your early summer week in Alaska. Last year, June saw the highest temperatures of the year and more sun than any other month, making for some beautiful days and great fishing.


Early season in Alaska is the real deal, and a time of the summer that is vastly overlooked by too many anglers. We still have a few great openings so call today and learn more about the great fishing opportunities for the coming season.

Contact us today and we’ll be happy to get you started on what can and should be an amazing Alaskan adventure!

Pablo Aguiló


Pointer Outfitters

Nubian Flats Season 2016 Report I

For the first week of the 2016 Nubian Flats season, we were blessed to be joined by a number of great characters of every corner of the planet. We were joined by Bruce from Scotland, Tom from the USA, and Johan from RSA. An interesting mix of cultures but all three of them had one thing in mind, fish!


Early on the morning of Day 1, the mothership steamed out of the harbour and set course for the first anchorage just south of Snake Island. The plan for the day was to fish the western side of the big Island for the day, looking for triggerfish and trevally. The morning started off well and not long into the walk Tom had a good shot at a permit with-in the 20lbs range. The fish showed good interest and followed the fly but then in true permit fashion, it decided that this was not the day, before spooking off into the distance.

Tom got given a second chance and soon after he was presenting his fly to another smaller permit. Again the fish showed plenty interest, but this time round Tom’s fly got snagged on the bottom. Needles to say, the fish lost interest and went in search of food elsewhere. By midday some clouds(very unusual for this time of the year) rolled in over the area and made sight-fishing a nightmare. With the low visibility, we changed tactics and ended off the day with some teasing along the outside reef of Snake Island. The lads landed some really nice bluefin trevally and ended the day in the high spirits.


On Day 2 the clouds disappeared and the guys got treated to some good fishing. Landing some good titan and yellow margin triggers on the flat, as well as some big bohar on the tease and one big GT lost.

On the morning of Day 3 we moved the mothership to the next anchorage to the north of Snake Island, where we planned to fish the last couple days of the trip before making our way back to Magarsam for the final day.

The massive sand flat that we call Shambaia had a good variety of species which included milkfish, some triggerfish, and trevally (both giant and bluefin), but the glassy conditions were just to calm and we landed very few fish. Most would think that glassy conditions are perfect, but try drop a fly in front of a weary fish without disturbing the water and making a noise. Almost impossible. Outside on the pinnacles however, the fish were on the feed and we tried to capitalize on this.

The flats on these pinnacles had some really big GT’s on them and we got handled by some brute’s! Tom hooked into a monster that somehow unhooked itself, and straight after Johan got cut off by a meter-plus sized fish that was unstoppable and swam him right off the flat and over the edge. On the tease it was even worse. Countless big GT’s were exploding like grenades behind the tease, and tearing through leaders like there was no tomorrow. Like fellow Italian Guide Federico would say, it was a“massacre satanico”. These pinnacles hold some spectacular fish but on this terrain it is almost impossible to land fish. Extremely sharp coral with crazy drop off’s is enough to even shred the best of tackle.


The lads kept the scoreboards ticking over and managed to land some small bluefin but the GT’s were clearly leading the scoreboard. GT’s Hero – Flyfisherman Zero

On the final day we were back on the northern side of the big Island and things were looking up. Bruce opened up the scoreboard by landing a very nice yellow margin triggerfish . Tom followed up soon by hooking into another nice yellow margin but this fish managed to chew through his light tippet before he could get it to the net. Next up Bruce, who was clearly on a good day, landed another beautiful yellow margin triggerfish. If the previous couple day’s hiding by the GT’s weren’t enough, we came across a good 90cm fish in super skinny water, hunting with his back sticking out of the water. Tom quickly got his 12wt ready but it was not to be. He placed the fly right in front of the geet, but got denied. Another victory for the trevally. But thats fishing.

It was a week of many highs and certainly a few lessons in what it takes to land fish in these conditions, but it was a week that was thoroughly enjoyed by all the guests and guides.

Mark Murray

Head Guide

Fly fishing Casa Blanca

Dear Friends of Pointer Outfitters. I just came back from a great fly fishing trip again. Casa Blanca is an angler’s paradise. Situated on the northern tip of Punta Pájaros with immediate access to the prime fishing areas of Ascension Bay, our guests spend less time travelling to the fish.


The lodge is built right on the water, overlooking a beautiful flat visited daily by bonefish schools, permit and tarpon. Some of the best fishing takes place right off the lighted pier after dark.

We were fortunate to catch good weather for most of the week. For the two preceding weeks, the weather was pretty bad.

A very wealthy fellow who lives in Mexico owns the 24 mile long island on which Casa Blanca and Playa Blanca are located. It is about a 55 charter flight from Cancun. Casa Blanca is located on the north end of the island (and such north end is on the sound end of Ascension Bay). Playa is located around 15 miles south of Casa.


The fall group that I go with consists of 14 fisherman who all stay at Playa. I have been a member of this group for 4 years. Pretty good fly fisherman.

A typical day at Playa Blanca, Like Casa Blanca, the fishing program at Playa starts with the sunrise, hand delivered coffee, and a delicious made to order breakfast from six to seven. Anglers then load up into the lodge truck for the five-minute ride to the Santa Rosa Lagoon pier or the ten-minute ride to Sacrificio flat, where skiffs and guides await.

Fishermen return home at approximately four p.m., and are driven back to the lodge for waiting appetizers and drinks. Many guests choose to spend the hours before dinner at our beach palapa. Ten feet from the water with a stocked bar, beach towels and snorkel sets, it’s a fantastic place to pass the late afternoon hours.


I do not recall the final fish count but will see if I can locate the same and send to you. We have a bonefish tournament mid week which results a decent bonefish count since the losing boat has to wear tutus the next day.

IMG_GR_testimonials1465855041.jpgPlenty of good shots at permit this year. A couple of 25 plus pounders with the rest being in the 10 to 15 range.

Lots of snook this trip. One day on my boat we caught 15 snook including 5 very nice sized fish. Could have caught more. Probably saw 60.

In one of the lagoons the snook and tarpon were stacked up. Folks probably saw 200 or so tarpon and 80 to 100 snook.

A number of us walk the beach with spin casting rods with spoons or top waters. Not too good this trip. Frequently catch barracuda and jack crevaile.

We have limited wifi at Playa. Cannot stream anything but can send and respond to emails.

The boats are 16 foot Dolphin boats with 40 or 50 horsepower hand driven Yamahas.

Casa is the bigger lodge that fishes Ascension Bay. Playa is the smaller lodge that fishes south of the lodge. Only one other lodge (located a further south a fair amount) is licensed to fish the waters that Playa fishes (and we infrequently see a boat from that lodge). Casa Blanca is remote but not disconnected. The main lodge has wireless Internet for guest use. There is no regular telephone service, but satellite phones are available for a small fee.

IMG_GR_testimonials1465855062.jpgThe group I go with are all from the States. My son Park has been with me once (in March of 2013). We both caught permit the same day.


My best

Rell Tipton



Tanzania Tigerfish

The last few weeks of any busy season can really seem to drag on for a jaded guide, and days and even sessions can have an infinite quality that takes some serious inner strength to endure. Given this possibility, it was really amazing how fast the second last week flew by in a blur of big fish and intense fishing, and altogether too soon we said farewell to Pat, Pete, Paul and Matt and suddenly the last group was upon us.


With the water still high and dirty, the rains still building and threatening, and a full house group of eight anglers to deal with, this was going to be a big task to make sure it would be a success for all involved. Luckily we were hosting some familiar faces in South African medics Petrus, Tinus, Harold and Jan, who had all been to Lesotho and/or Sudan with Tourette in recent times. They were joined by fellow doctors Charl, Neil, Willem and Henk, whose medical expertise was immediately called upon to help stitch up Rob’s Tiger bite, incurred landing one of the many of last week’s fish!

035052A4111-XLAny time the water levels rise and colour, although the fishing switches off, as long as there is no more rain upstream, there is always the enticing possibility of wild fishing as the water resumes its original condition. This is what we were banking on rescuing the week, and the early indications were positive as the levels continued to drop over the first two days. Going against history, it was the Mnyera that seemed to be recovering faster, and the fishing began to follow suit. Starting slowly and progressively improving over the following days, it seemed that it was the larger fish that were the most active. This seemed to mean that extended quiet spells were routinely shattered by a series of violent takes before suddenly going quiet again, making for riveting fishing! By the end of their allotted 3 days fishing on the Mnyera, it was fair to say that the guys had made the most of their time, with Petrus boasting 2x 16lb, Henk a 17lb, Jan a 14lb and Willem helping himself to a 19lb late on the Tuesday afternoon in Kasingo rapids. Not bad going at all!

IMG_GR_testimonials1465338476The Ruhudji was proving a tougher challenge as the waters continued to drop, but remained cool and dirty, and the flood had also moved a lot of riverbed material around, completely changing the face of many of the established spots and forcing us to really re evaluate every spot from scratch. There was a healthy number of mid-smaller size fish that kept us busy with some areas really stacked up with plenty of lively specimens. Charl did break the mould in a big way early on the first full morning, in the midst of a couple of really good hits at a busy spot on the lower Ruhudji, finally converting a faultless 18lb and setting himself up very nicely for bragging rights! Tinus had some great shots at some big fish in a hot drift through a shallow straight on the middle Ruhudji, connecting with three 15lb+ fish that all somehow came unstuck! He did manage to convert a sweet 12lb the next day which went down very well!

IMG_GR_testimonials1465338563Come change over time, it seemed that Charl, Neil, Harold and Tinus were in the pound seats with the Mnyera showing slightly more promise than the still clearing Ruhudji, although they would do really well to top Petrus, Willem, Jan and Henks exploits!

IMG_GR_testimonials1465338589      As it unfolded, it did indeed prove to be the case, as really big fish were prowling aggressively, and time and time again, one of the guys found themselves plugged into a real handful of a fish. It reached a point where it became genuinely difficult to judge the size of the fish eating, as the hits were consistently aggressive, and all seemed to point to huge fish! Many of them proved to be too hot to handle, a couple more snapped off, and a some managed to make it to the boat, with Charl again in the mix with another 18lber, Neil with a 19lb and 13lb on popper during a purple patch in the rapids, and Tinus and Harold clocking in with 17lb and 14lb respectively. A high class roster of fish, no doubt, but these three days were definitely about the ones that got away, with everyone experiencing the true wrath of big aggressive tigers on multiple occasions, which is what it really is all about!

024052A3661-XLOn the Ruhudji, the fishing remained tough, but the laughs came easily as the guys made light work of fishing the unfavourable conditions. Henk managed to maintain his golden touch, and seemed to be right on the Tigers’ wavelength, knowing when to fish hard and when to sit back, relax, and enjoy some time out on the river. He managed a 14lb and 11lb plus a handful of smaller fish on a morning where the other boat did not register a take for the whole morning session! Willem also lured a 16lb out of a tricky spot to add some quality to a tough day on the upper beat.

017052A4429-XLOne of the great things about these trips is the quality time we get to spend with some great individuals, and the entertainment value of this trip was top-drawer, making the tough fishing a breeze as the jokes and impromptu musicals kept a constant upbeat vibe! Petrus capped off a superb week by spending his last two hours pursuing a Black Velvet, and I personally couldn’t have asked for a better way to cap of the 2015 season than landing a beautiful specimen at the death! The enjoyment and appreciation for this stunning fish will be remembered for a long time!


In so many ways it was the perfect ending to a fantastic season, great fishing with a group of guys who were out to enjoy themselves whatever came their way, and who really took pleasure in the many small things that make tiger fishing on in the Kilombero Valley the life experience it is. The rains held off, the rivers cleared up, the big fish came out to play, and when the fishing was tough, and the guys took enjoyment from the mind blowing natural wonders around us. This was a blessing for us as season weary guides because it forced us to see it all again like the first week of a season, and reminded us how lucky we are to be able to work here and how much we would miss it until the next season!

016052A4334-XLThe staggering number of huge fish encountered in this last week is also a great comfort for us as it reassures us that the strict fishing management system is working, and that fishing pressure is not an issue throughout a busy season, and it means we can look forward to more of the same rip roaring action next year! Until then.

Greg, Mark, Stu, Rob, Keith and the KNS team!

Bonefish Special

I was holding my third cup of coffee. It was early in the morning but the sun has already been shinning for a while. The flavor of the coffee in Cuba is different. It was good and I need it to wake up. I still had the flavor of the rhum that we drank the night before with our friends from UK and US. I knew my guide Argelio would be waiting for me to jump on the boat and go to Cachi Boca area, but we had time. It is not good to be in a rush when you go fly fishing.

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Mentally; I checked if my gear and equipment was all there as it was supposed to be before taking off from the Patana. I had a sage #8 rod for some bonefish and a TFO #10 rod for tarpon or permit, my reels with floating and sinking lines, the wading boots, my buff, gloves, etc. and my food, very important! I had cameras, sunblock and other staff in my waterproof baggage, and my coffee cup was almost empty.

IMG_GR_testimonials1419336708Time for rock and roll. I took my shoes (I should say crocks) off and I was ready for a ride. It was a beautiful morning, with a lovely breeze. It took us around 40 minutes till we were close to the lighting house of Cachi Boca. Then, Argelio chose some flats and we started moving around with the skif boat and the pou. Water was clear and the wind was not making waves over the surface. Nice. Easy to watch the fish. The water was 15 to 20 inches in some areas, so we anchor the boat and get into the water to walk a little bit. In between us and some mangroves that where about 70 yards away, there was a sand bank and a deep blue channel of water, it looked like a good area. The waves were moving to the sand bank.

We walked 20 yards, and jackpot! Like 50 bonefish were feeding on the flats, just being careful of the blue water, where (we knew later) a barracuda was waiting for them. We took some lines and we started some cast in the air. Argelio, the guide, was just behind me giving me instructions, like: hold on, they are moving, they are going away, they are coming back, cast 50 inches in front. Ok, they split, go to the second group, there is a big one there. Nice fish. Ok now, cast 2 o clock and 18 yards, ok yes, that is a good one, hold, NOW. And a bonefish is fighting with us trying to avoid the blue water, just running in the flats like crazy.IMG_GR_testimonials1419336417

It was a paradise; the bonefish were in the yellow area. It was a blue channel, and a beautiful green and turquoise water. In mainland, there was a group of grey trees and palm trees and white sand, and in that paradise area, two guys, were just fly fishing for a bonefish, 4 hours away from the closer city and 12 hours away from the closer international airport. That was a fly fishing experience, where the remote area and the feeling of our soul in connection with nature made us feel for a minute that life could be forever.

We hope you can fish one of these flats with us. It is a unique experience. We hope every person that fly fish, to live this experience.

My best

Pablo Aguilo

Pointer Fly Fishing